Costa Rica- Important Phrases

What is your name? ¿Cuál es su nombre?
Hello! ¡Hola!
Pure Life Pura Vida
Good Morning Buenos días
Good Afternoon Buenas tardes
Good night Buenas noches
 don’t understand No entiendo
Slower, please: Más despacio, por favor
Do you speak English? ¿Habla usted inglés?
 don’t speak Spanish No hablo español
How much is it? ¿Cuánta cuesta?
What’s the rate of exchange ¿Cuál es el tipo de cambio?
I’m sick Estoy enfermo
What time is it? ¿Que hora es?
Where is the restroom/bathroom? ¿Donde está el baño/servicio sanitario?
Thank you Muchas gracias
Your are welcome Por nada.
 Where is… Donde esta?…
  Where can I get a taxi? ¿Dónde puedo encontrar un taxi?

Courtesy of tripadvisor.com

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Costa Rica History- Lost civilization

Humans have inhabited the rain forests of Costa Rica for 10,000 years. The region long served as an intersection for America’s native cultures. About 500 years ago, on the eve of European discovery, it is guesstimated that as many as 400,000 people lived in today’s Costa Rica.

Knowledge about these pre-Columbian cultures is scant. The remains of lost civilizations were washed away by torrential rains, and Spanish conquerors were more intent on destroying rather than describing native lifestyles. Until recently, Costa Ricans showed little interest in their ancient past.

The region hosted roughly 20 small tribes, organized into chiefdoms, indicating a permanent leader, or cacique, who sat atop a hierarchical society that included shaman, warriors, toilers and slaves. The language of the Central Valley Huetar Indians was known throughout all regions. The Central Valley contains the only major archaeological site uncovered in Costa Rica at Guayabo. Thought to be an ancient ceremonial center, it featured paved streets, an aqueduct and decorative gold.

To the east, the Carib Indians, naked and fierce, dominated the Atlantic coastal lowlands. Adept at seafaring, the Carib tribes were a conduit of trade with the South American mainland. The Indians in the northwest were connected to the great Meso-American cultures. Aztec religious practices and Mayan jade and craftsmanship are in evidence in the Península de Nicoya, while Costa Rican quetzal feathers and golden trinkets have turned up in Mexico. These more concentrated tribes tended corn fields. The three chiefdoms found in the southwest showed the influence of Andean Indian cultures, including coca leaves, yucca and sweet potatoes.

Still a puzzle are the hundreds of hand-sculpted, monolithic stone spheres that dot the landscape of the southwest’s Diquis Valley, as well as the Isla del Caño. Weighing up to 16 tons and ranging in size from a baseball to a Volkswagen, the spheres have inspired many theories: an ancient calendar, extraterrestrial meddling, or a game of bocce gone terribly awry.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Travel Profile: Manuel Antonio

Manuel Antonio National Park in Costa Rica is located on the Pacific coast, in the Costa Rican province of Puntarenas. Though small, it’s the most visited park in Costa Rica — and one of the most beautiful.

What to Do:

Truly, Manuel Antonio looks just like a picture postcard. Every color is cranked up to full saturation, from the stingingly aqua water to the lime-green forest, with perfect strips of pale sand stretching between. Manuel Antonio boasts four beaches in total: Playita, Espadilla, Manuel Antonio, and Escondido. Take a hike along the narrow, sandy bridge to Punta Cathedral (once an island) for unforgettable Pacific views.

Stroll down one of the park’s several walking trails, and you might spy coatimundis, ocelots, sloths, monkeys (possibly even the endangered squirrel monkey), caiman, anteaters, along with birds of every shape and color imaginable. The offshore coral reefs bustle with marine life, including dolphins and whales—book a day trip out to Caño island for some prime scuba diving.

Manuel Antonio is so pristine, one would think it was entirely removed from society. But the hotels and cabins crowded along the park’s periphery offer fine dining, ample nightlife, and accommodations to satisfy most budgets.

Courtesy of about.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Quepos Sunset

 Quepos, Costa Rica Sunset PicturesKirsten Noelle Hubbard
On a trip to Manuel Antonio in Costa Rica we chose to stay at the nearby village of Quepos for some local color — and did we ever find it.After two day of rain, the clouds broke at last. That evening, we headed down to the Quepos beaches for one of the most stunning sunsets of our lives. I hope these sunset photos will inspire you to experience some Costa Rica sunsets of your own!

Courtesy of about.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Costa Rica Travel: When Should I Go?

The American summer is Costa Rica’s wet season. While that means occasional rainstorms (often tempestuous), it also means far less travelers. November and December are the driest months to visit, but prices skyrocket, and there are so many travelers reservations must be made for everything far in advance. Thus, it’s a toss up—-it all depends on your personal concerns.

Courtesy of about.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Costa Rica Travel: How Do I Get There and Around?

The public bus system in Costa Rica is the cheapest, and often the most convenient way to travel anywhere you want to go. Buses range from flashy old American school buses (or “< ahref=”http://gocentralamerica.about.com/od/glossary/g/Chickenbus.htm”>chicken buses”) to higher-quality express buses with air conditioning–check out Toucan Guides’ Costa Rica bus schedule for times and destinations.

The main hub of bus transit in Costa Rica is the Coca Cola Bus Terminal in San Jose.

If you’re traveling with a good deal of luggage and not visiting any remote areas, it may be worth it to rent a car. Taxis are also widespread, and will take passengers long distances for a price.

If you’re country-hopping, Ticabus is the best way to do it. This comfortable, accommodating bus line runs all the way through Costa Rica, up to Guatemala in the north, and to Panama in the south.

Courtesy of about.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Costa Rica Travel: What Are the People Like?

Costa Ricans, called Ticos, have a strong sense of nationalism. They take pride in their country’s natural beauty, and in its democracy. While much of Costa Rican culture is distinctly western, Costa Rica is a catholic nation, and is more conservative in many aspects than the United States—it’s important to dress respectfully in all areas except the beach resorts. In addition, it never hurts to learn a few Costa Rican Words and Phrases.

Courtesy of about.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment